Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Missed opportunity

I've read several books about the music industry, mostly books about artists or genres but occasionally about a specific label--two memorable ones are The Label: The Story of Columbia Records by Gary Marmorstein and Where Did Our Love Go?: The Rise and Fall of the Motown Sound by Nelson George. A new book, Cowboys and Indies by Gareth Murphy, claims in its subtitle to be "the epic history of the record industry" but it falls far short being that--and I wonder if the author realizes the punnish reference in his subtitle, as Epic is a major label, a subsidiary of Columbia and home of Michael Jackson's legacy.

According to his acknowledgments page, Murphy did do some original interviews, but the bulk of the book seems to consist of material from other books, so if, like me, you already have some background, there isn't much new here. He focuses on people and companies about which there is lots of published material (Columbia, Island, Warner/Atlantic, Elektra, Asylum) and virtually ignores other major labels like RCA, Decca/MCA, Stax, and even Reprise which was started by Frank Sinatra and included Joni Mitchell, Frank Zappa and Neil Young on its roster. For the most part, the only new material in here that I found interesting was about Herb Alpert's label A&M, and a couple of gossipy tidbits about cocaine use at Casablanca Records--someone should write an entire book about how the record industry went coke-crazy in the 70s.


Murphy at least begins at the beginning, with Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Edison, and he spends a lot of time on the punk years, presenting interesting information on the influential labels Sire and Stiff. But the omissions are numerous, and perhaps the most egregious one is the small amount of space he spends on the Beatles and their twisted record label history in the U.S. before they hit it big on Capitol. I guess this was not a total waste of time--I loved his description of Walter Yetnikoff, head of the CBS Records conglomerate, speaking in "fuck-littered Yiddish,"--but the subtitle makes you expect more than you will get. Disappointing.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

The fuss over Gone Girl

Most surface descriptions of Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn make it sound like it is not the kind of book I typically read: a missing wife police procedural with a brutal husband as a suspect. Some descriptions stress another element that doesn't always work for me: the out-of-nowhere narrative twist like happens so often in the films of M. Night Shyamalan. And though the critics generally like the book, the "everyday people" I knew who had read it were split between loving it and hating it. So on an impulse, I bought this in paperback as a summer read, though I couldn't wait for summer.

The story is, in fact, a missing-wife, suspect-husband tale, reminiscent of the Scott and Laci Peterson story. On the morning of their fifth anniversary, Amy, the wife of Nick, goes missing. Did she leave on her own accord?--she and Nick were having problems. Was she kidnapped?--her parents are the wealthy authors of a series of children's books whose central character was based on Amy. Was she murdered?--there are no visible signs of struggle until some suspicious blood traces are found in the kitchen.

The situation is fairly standard thriller boilerplate, but what makes the book worth reading is the narrative style. The first half of the book is told in alternating voices: the interior voice of Nick, who we figure out quickly is not the most reliable narrator (he makes oblique references to a disposable cell phone ringing but never tells us who's calling), and the voice of the missing Amy through her diary entries of the past few years, who seems generally more reliable. Then halfway through, a twist occurs--somewhat predictably but still joltingly--that throws everything we think we know about these two in a different light.

To say much more would spoil the fun, and despite some very dark turns the plot takes, reading the book is indeed fun. Nick and Amy are both unpleasant people but getting to know them is very interesting. Almost no one in the book is a nice person, and I had great fun with the author's takedown of awful CNN crime commentator Nancy Grace--under a fictional name, of course. I think some folks don't like the sexual politics, and may fault Flynn (pictured above) for what might be seen as the trivialization of some issues, including rape accusations. Where I found fault was in the ending--the last 30 pages or so seem like they're building steam to a real "gotcha" ending, but that's not quite the case. Still, I enjoyed this popcorn thriller, and it should make a good movie.

Friday, March 28, 2014

The Old Curmudgeon meets the Oscar Movies

Since I rarely venture out to see current movies in theaters anymore, I wait for them to show up on DVD/cable/streaming, which means that, since the "serious" Oscar-bait movies don't get released theatrically until November or December, and therefore don't become available to us shut-ins for at least 90 days, I don't see many of the movies up for major Oscars until after the awards have been won or lost. When the nominees were announced in January, I had seen only one nominee, The Great Gatsby, and that was up for the relatively lowly awards of costume and production design. By now, I've caught up with most of the ones I plan on seeing so a quick report follows, minus the usual plot summaries since I assume most everyone knows the basics.

Gravity: Yes, I should have seen this in a 3D theater, because on a flat 2D TV screen, even a widescreen plasma TV screen, this movie falls flat because of the cardboard characters, cheap sentimentality, and the pinball-like bopping and banging of Bullock and Clooney against the space vehicles which gets tedious after ten minutes. I like the two actors, but they failed to hold me spellbound, and the 3D effects are pretty much lost in 2D.


Inside Llewyn Davis: I tend to go one of three ways with the Coen Brothers: they have their 5-star films (Blood Simple, Fargo, Intolerable Cruelty, Miller's Crossing), their 4-star films (The Hudsucker Proxy, O Brother Where Art Thou, Raising Arizona, The Big Lebowksi, The Ladykillers), and their 0-star films (Barton Fink, The Man Who Wasn't There, True Grit, though I give Fink points for John Goodman alone). This film is maybe a star and a half. The central performance by Oscar Isaac, above, is very good, but he plays a lukewarm character whom we never either accept nor completely reject, a 60s folksinger who is adrift after the death of his singing partner. Goodman (again) provides one of the few bright spots, but his role is basically a cameo. Loved the cats, was bored with the rest.

Blue Jasmine: Cate Blanchett deserved the Oscar for her unpleasant but riveting central character, apparently inspired by the wife of Bernie Madoff, but the rest of the movie doesn't quite live up to her. It's not as immediately recognizable as a Woody Allen film as most of his are, but Allen never quite finds the style (or wit) to make the movie as a whole memorable. It's a perfectly respectable film, much better than most of Allen's 21st century failures (Anything Else, Whatever Works), but it's not up there with the pleasures of Midnight in Paris or To Rome With Love.

Frozen: Lovely fun Disney musical. I'm not a fan of current-day animated features, but this is much more like the Disney classic Beauty and the Beast than like anything else that's come out lately from Pixar or DreamWorks or Fox or even Disney. The songs are almost on a par with Beast's, the characters are charming, and the villain isn't the Snow Queen (the influence of Wicked, I would say).

Nebraska:  Slow and meandering with a fairly unsatisfying payoff. Bruce Dern's performance is OK, but much of it consists of him sitting and staring into space. Will Forte is good as the son, but June Squibb steals the show as Dern's outspoken wife.

American Hustle: I think people like this fantasia on the Abscam scandal for the same reason they liked Argo: the 70s vibe, presented both authentically and a hint of irony. Argo had a nice light touch, which this movie could have used, but instead it feels like Scorsese lite, like the director was trying for a Goodfellas style. Though it has its moments, mostly thanks again to the actors (especially Jennifer Lawrence, Jeremy Renner and a nicely understated Christian Bale), this never takes off.

The Wolf of Wall Street: This is Scorsese lite from the source himself, and my favorite of the nominees for Best Picture. There have been complaints about the foul language and the glamorizing of the lead character, a dishonest stockbroker played quite well by Leonardo DiCaprio (above). Scorsese glamorizing bad behavior? Really?... I'm shocked. Perhaps because these are Wall Street guys and not gangsters, the cursing (and general atmosphere) is not as threatening as in, for example, Goodfellas, which this movie reminded me of. At 3 hours, it is too long, and almost every scene could have been shortened, but there is an energy here that I found lacking in most of the other films.

I may eventually see 12 Years a Slave, Her, and Philomena. Probably won't see Dallas Buyers Club or Captain Phillips. If they ever bring Gravity back to 3D theaters, I might give it a shot. And as far as Gatsby, I liked it, didn't love it. It's certainly better than the Redford and Alan Ladd versions, which is probably faint praise.

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Bubblegum Archives: Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep

A few years back when I was blogging here more often, I occasionally wrote about one of my favorite pop music genres, bubblegum music. I defined it here and promised I would write more later. I did write about a handful of my favorite bubblegum songs but never got back to the subject on a regular basis. Here's hoping I will now.


I was moved to think about this yesterday when "Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep" played on my iPod. Here in the States, that song was a top 20 hit in 1971 for Mac and Katy Kissoon, a brother and sister act from Trinidad (pictured above). Here in Columbus, that version got a lot of airplay and I bought the single. It's a cute... well, chirpy little song about a baby bird, or so I thought. The original version, by a Liverpool singer named Lally Stott, never made it past #92 on Billboard though it was a hit in Australia and his is the one I have on my iPod, as it was the only one available digitally some years back when I bought it. A third version by a Scottish band called Middle of the Road was a #1 hit in England. According to Wikipedia, the Scottish version is in the top 40 of all-time best-selling singles (pre-digital era), yet I have never heard the song on an oldies station. Hearing it again after all these years made me wonder why it was such a big hit then and seems to be so forgotten now.


The verse, repeated 3 or 4 times, sounded to me like this: "Where´s your momma gone?/Little baby boy/Where´s your momma gone/Far far away." This alternates with a verse that substitutes "Poppa" for "Momma." The chorus: "Last night I heard my momma singing this song/Ooh wee chirpy chirpy cheep cheep/Woke up this morning and my momma was gone/ Ooh wee chirpy chirpy cheep cheep/Chirpy chirpy cheep cheep chirp." I assumed this was about a baby bird waking up one morning to find his mom and dad gone. The lyrics are just too sad to think about, but the melody is upbeat and, well, chirpy, so you wind up singing along without giving the meaning of the lyrics much thought.

But, is it really about a bird? The title line is the only reference to birds, and it's actually ambigious; it could just as easily have been "Le-dee-da-dee-da, da" or "Yippei-yippie-yo-yo" or any other nonsense syllables. There is also some confusion about one of the lines. Instead of "Little baby boy" as I heard it, some Internet sources give "Little baby gone," though most give "Little baby Don." There is a video of Middle of the Road performing it and she is clearly singing "Don." 

So, what the hell? Is this a horrifically sad song about a little boy named Don whose parents are no longer around? Are they dead? Did they get drunk and stay the night somewhere else? Have they broken up and forgotten about Don? Or is is about a bird named Don whose parents were killed as prey? The more I think about it, the creepier it gets. It actually reminds me of a 90s hit called "The Way" by Fastball about parents who leave their home and family never to return because they're looking for "eternal summer slacking." Ask.com confidently states that it is about an abandoned bird, though I kind of like the implication given by another answerer: "That's the way my ex started out. At first he was chirpy, then...."

No matter what interpretation you accept, it's an awfully sad song. That's what I get for thinking too hard about bubblegum lyrics. As for why the song is forgotten now, well, that's probably a topic for a longer blog post about the oldies canon, but generally the more nursery-rhymey the song was, the more likely it is to plunge towards oblivion, no matter how popular it was at one time. The Fifth Estate had a big hit with a Wizard of Oz song, "Ding! Dong! The Witch is Dead" but you never hear that, either. Come to think of it, most of the classic bubblegum songs of the 60s are missing in action ("Chewy Chewy," "Yummy Yummy Yummy," "Gimmie Dat Ding") except for the Archies' "Sugar Sugar." I'll have to chew on this and chirp some more on the subject later. The Mac & Katy Kissoon version is below:



Wednesday, December 18, 2013

Was The Sound of Music Live really that bad?

Now that some of the smoke has cleared, I'll weigh in on the live television production of The Sound of Music that was broadcast a couple of weeks ago. I won't worry about a plot summary since we all know the story. I have to start by saying that all I know of the show is the movie; I knew going in that the play is quite different from the movie so I tried not to have unrealistic expectations. And I knew that no one was going to outdo Julie Andrews. Still, I have to agree with the majority opinion on Carrie Underwood--her acting was bad, like mediocre community theater acting (there are many community theater actors who are better than Underwood--in fact, I live with one!). Because of that, the show had no center--Underwood's presence was puny, as though she was just one of the children. Her voice was strong and she certainly looked the part, but her Maria had no personality, let alone being a force of nature like Andrews' Maria.

The other weak link was Stephen Moyer as Captain Von Trapp. Moyer has theatrical chops, though he's mostly known for his role as a vampire in True Blood. I've never seen the show so I didn't have any preconceptions; he was adequate but not compelling. Again, it's probably unfair to compare him to Christopher Plummer in the movie, but Plummer did a great job making the potentially one-dimensional character both stern and sly, hard yet vulnerable; Moyer just made him stiff and stoic, and because he and Underwoood had no chemistry, the romance never came alive.

Now the good stuff: Christan Borle (a Tony-winner who played Debra Messing's writing partner on TV's Smash) brought a snarky but not overdone sense of fun to the character of Max, and Laura Benanti (a Tony-winner who played a grief therapist in the Matthew Perry show Go On; pictured below with Moyer) was fabulous as Frau Schrader--not a Baroness here--the tough businesswoman who loses the Captain to Maria. In the movie, the part was rewritten to make her a bitchy villain, but in the play she's considerably more pleasant. She and Max have two songs not in the movie which, while not particularly memorable, help to flesh the characters out. Benanti is the real revelation here, bringing the play to life whenever she appeared.

Of course, we all knew that Audra McDonald would be brilliant as the Mother Abbess and she was. True to the stage show, she sings "My Favorite Things" with Maria, but her big moment is with "Climb Every Mountain" which brought tears to my eyes (and, to her credit, Underwood's). The children were all fine, especially Ariane Rinehart as Liesel, the oldest, who sings "Sixteen Going on Seventeen."

There's also the thrill of seeing a stage production on television, live or otherwise. Growing up in the 60s and 70s, it was not unusual to see staged plays on sets especially on PBS, and this production made me realize that I miss that. The sets were lovely, and there were a couple of nice theatrical transition scenes, in particular at the beginning of the wedding scene when the set of the house opens up and the actors march into the abbey.

Overall, I'm glad this was done and I enjoyed watching it. I realize that without a name like Carrie Underwood in the lead, this would not have gotten done in the first place, but perhaps in the future, the producers will have more faith and stick with Broadway-level talent if they try this again--and given that the ratings were good, they might.

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Fosse

I didn't want to write about another book, but it seems like most of my recent reviews have been negative and I thought I should share my positive reaction to this one, a biography of dancer, choreographer and director Bob Fosse by Sam Wasson called simply Fosse. I read a previous biography, All His Jazz by Martin Gotfried, which did a nice job of presenting the surface of Fosse's life and achievements, but this book really brings him to life, talent, quirks, foibles and all.



Though Fosse died in 1987, his dance style (both on stage and in movie visuals) has remained influential: dancers with bowler hats, making sharp angular movements, pulling their bodies in then opening out, portrayed on film with quick jagged editing. Not all of his hit Broadway shows (Pippin, Sweet Charity, Chicago) have aged well, though all have had successful revivals, and Chicago became a record-breaker in its 1996 revival, still running and ranked as the 3rd longest-running Broadway show in history. But as far as pop culture memory, his movies will probably be his legacy, and two of them, Cabaret and All That Jazz, remain major movie musical milestones, as well as two of my favorite all-time movies.

Fosse was a classic Type A personality: a competitive workaholic who was never happy with his achievements. He was a womanizer who nevertheless inspired loyalty in most of his conquests, and a hard-driving taskmaster who inspired fervent loyalty among his dancers and actors. This book shows his full range of personality, from talented genius to petty belittler of others, from promiscuous playboy to steady partner (he remained close friends with his wife Gwen Verdon after their separation in 1971; they never divorced and she was at his side when he died in 1987).


Though Wasson didn't get to interview Fosse or Verdon (who died in 2000), he did get information from several lovers (including Ann Reinking) and buddies, and the book presents a well-rounded picture of the man. I knew that All That Jazz was autobiographical--the story of a driven choreographer and director (played by Roy Scheider, pictured above) balancing finishing editing on a movie while he gets started on a new Broadway musical--but I didn't know exactly how precise the movie's details were, and the section on the making of the movie was my favorite part of the book, but if you have any interest at all in Fosse and his works, this book will be catnip. My one complaint: like All That Jazz, the book stops abruptly at Fosse's death, without a wrap-up chapter showing how important his legacy was and is. Otherwise, a wonderful read.

Saturday, November 9, 2013

Blue Christmas, indeed

My first seasonal book this year was a big disappointment. Every bit of the title of this book by Ronald D. Lankford Jr. is misleading: Sleigh Rides, Jingle Bells & Silent Nights: A Cultural History of American Christmas Songs. First of all, "Sleigh Ride," "Jingle Bells," and "Silent Night" are not mentioned in this book--certainly Leroy Anderson's "Sleigh Ride" belongs here. Second, this is not a history of American Christmas songs, it is an quasi-academic survey of a handful of such songs; maybe 15, if that many, are written about in any detail. The "cultural" part of the title is accurate; the author does a nice job throwing a net around Christmas popular culture of the past fifty years as he sets up context for the discussion of songs, but material on the songs is weak and unfulfilling.
His thesis is interesting: the genre of American Christmas pop music, which was born during World War II and largely ended in the 1960s, is not about any of the religious aspects of Christmas, but instead focuses on domesticity, nostalgia, romance, and commercial consumption. Each chapter covers one of these areas, and when he writes on music of the 40s, he's on solid ground, with songs such as "White Christmas," "Winter Wonderland," and "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town." His conclusions are fairly obvious but his reflections on the songs and their reception are fun to read.

But by 1965, and "Christmas Time Is Here" from A Charlie Brown Christmas, he loses steam. He includes that particular song in his chapter on "blues and hard times," but I don't think he makes a strong case for that. The show, yes, is certainly about being depressed as Christmas, but that song doesn't seem to me to be about holiday blues. There is a tension between the happy lyrics and the slow plodding performance, but that tone strikes me more as mild nostalgic melancholy, ending as it does with, "Oh, that we could always see/Such spirit through the year."

After that, he has a chapter on satire, focusing on "Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer" (the popularity of which seems more tied to shock value than to any major disenchantment with Christmas itself), and that's it. He doesn't discuss songs such as "Jingle Bell Rock," "Holly Jolly Christmas," "Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree," "Little Drummer Boy," "Silver Bells," "Do You Hear What I Hear," "Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)," "Please Daddy, Don't Get Drunk This Christmas," "Please Come Home for Christmas," or "All I Want for Christmas Is You." I know that he's not intending to cover British songs, but I could write several paragraphs on Elton John's "Step Into Christmas," a lyrically interesting song which was and remains popular in America, not to mention John Lennon's "Happy Xmas (War is Over)."

The academic prose style is clear, and there has been a lot of research done, but ultimately, as obvious as his points are and as much as he has left out, I doubt that this would pass muster as a dissertation in a university English department. And as it doesn't seem pitched at a average music buff reader, I'm not sure who would be satisfied by this half-baked presentation. I hope there are better holiday books to be read before the 25th of December rolls around.